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Sic transit gloria mundi is a Latin phrase that means “Thus passes the glory of the world. As the newly chosen pope proceeded this...

Sic transit gloria mundi is a Latin phrase that means “Thus passes the glory of the world. As the newly chosen pope proceeded this fleeting world pdf the sacristy of St. Peter’s Basilica in his sedia gestatoria, the procession stopped three times.


On each occasion a papal master of ceremonies would fall to his knees before the pope, holding a silver or brass reed, bearing a tow of smoldering flax. For three times in succession, as the cloth burned away, he would say in a loud and mournful voice, “Pater Sancte, sic transit gloria mundi!

Holy Father, so passes worldly glory! These words, thus addressed to the pope, served as a reminder of the transitory nature of life and earthly honors. The stafflike instrument used in the aforementioned ceremony is known as a “sic transit gloria mundi”, named for the master of ceremonies’ words. Emily Dickinson used the line in a whimsical valentine written to William Howland in 1852 and subsequently published in the Springfield Daily Republican: It parodied her education by its use of stock phrases and morals.

English most idiomatic is “All that’s fair must fade,” following a line of Thomas Moore. In Romanian, “Toate cele frumoase, poartă și ponoase”.

Within Buddhism, the corresponding doctrine is impermanence. The prosperous inevitably decline, the full inevitably empty”. In Japan this is well-known due to its use is the opening line of The Tale of the Heike, whose latter half reads “the color of the sāla flowers reveals the truth that the prosperous must decline. Imitation of Christ: translated from Latin into English.

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