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An antimicrobial is an agent that kills microorganisms or stops their growth. Antimicrobial medicines can microbiological screening methods for antimicrobial activity pdf grouped according...

An antimicrobial is an agent that kills microorganisms or stops their growth. Antimicrobial medicines can microbiological screening methods for antimicrobial activity pdf grouped according to the microorganisms they act primarily against.

For example, antibiotics are used against bacteria and antifungals are used against fungi. They can also be classified according to their function. Agents that kill microbes are called microbicidal, while those that merely inhibit their growth are called biostatic.

The use of antimicrobial medicines to treat infection is known as antimicrobial chemotherapy, while the use of antimicrobial medicines to prevent infection is known as antimicrobial prophylaxis. The term “antibiotic” originally described only those formulations derived from living organisms but is now also applied to synthetic antimicrobials, such as the sulphonamides, or fluoroquinolones. Antibacterial agents can be further subdivided into bactericidal agents, which kill bacteria, and bacteriostatic agents, which slow down or stall bacterial growth. In response, further advancements in antimicrobial technologies have resulted in solutions that can go beyond simply inhibiting microbial growth.

Instead, certain types of porous media have been developed to kill microbes on contact. Antimicrobial use is known to have been common practice for at least 2000 years. Ancient Egyptians and ancient Greeks used specific molds and plant extracts to treat infection. In the 19th century, microbiologists such as Louis Pasteur and Jules Francois Joubert observed antagonism between some bacteria and discussed the merits of controlling these interactions in medicine.

In 1928, Alexander Fleming became the first to discover a natural antimicrobial fungus known as Penicillium rubens and named the extracted substance penicillin which in 1942 was successfully used to treat a Streptococcus infection. Selman Waksman, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for developing 22 antibiotics—most notably Streptomycin. Antibacterials are used to treat bacterial infections. The drug toxicity to humans and other animals from antibacterials is generally considered low.

Prolonged use of certain antibacterials can decrease the number of gut flora, which may have a negative impact on health. Consumption of probiotics and reasonable eating can help to replace destroyed gut flora. Stool transplants may be considered for patients who are having difficulty recovering from prolonged antibiotic treatment, as for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections.

The discovery, development and use of antibacterials during the 20th century has reduced mortality from bacterial infections. 1945 to 1970, when a number of structurally diverse and highly effective agents were discovered and developed. 1980 the introduction of new antimicrobial agents for clinical use has declined, in part because of the enormous expense of developing and testing new drugs.

In parallel there has been an alarming increase in antimicrobial resistance of bacteria, fungi, parasites and some viruses to multiple existing agents. Antibacterials are among the most commonly used drugs and among the drugs commonly misused by physicians, for example, in viral respiratory tract infections.

As a consequence of widespread and injudicious use of antibacterials, there has been an accelerated emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, resulting in a serious threat to global public health. The resistance problem demands that a renewed effort be made to seek antibacterial agents effective against pathogenic bacteria resistant to current antibacterials.

Possible strategies towards this objective include increased sampling from diverse environments and application of metagenomics to identify bioactive compounds produced by currently unknown and uncultured microorganisms as well as the development of small-molecule libraries customized for bacterial targets. Antifungals are used to kill or prevent further growth of fungi. In medicine, they are used as a treatment for infections such as athlete’s foot, ringworm and thrush and work by exploiting differences between mammalian and fungal cells. They kill off the fungal organism without dangerous effects on the host.

Unlike bacteria, both fungi and humans are eukaryotes. Thus, fungal and human cells are similar at the molecular level, making it more difficult to find a target for an antifungal drug to attack that does not also exist in the infected organism.

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